Aircraft Maintenance Engineering:

If you thought flying was all about pilots, guess again.

No aircraft anywhere leaves the ground without being checked by an engineer. Being an aircraft maintenance engineer means working on the most exciting and advanced technology in the world. So if an exciting and interesting career working as part of a dynamic team, on some of the newest and most powerful machines on the planet is for you, then there is no better job for you than this. Aircraft engineers are always in demand by airlines and aviation companies all over the world.

This job can take you all over Australia, to Asia, the Middle East and Europe. You can earn great pay, receive fabulous travel benefits for you and your family and all this start with us here at MUSA Emerging Sciences Academy.

MUSA Emerging Sciences Academy courses provide you with the essential training required to begin your career in Aircraft Maintenance. We also offer courses for employees already working in the industry who are looking to upskill or advance their careers.

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering is recognized by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and for the purpose of aircraft maintenance engineer licensing. EASA sets the world standard for aircraft maintenance engineering allowing trainees to pursue career in aircraft maintenance in Pakistan and around the globe.

Difference between Aerospace engineering and an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer:

Most of the general public thinks that aerospace engineers are the maintenance engineers which are wrong concepts developed in our society.

Aerospace engineering is the primary branch of engineering concerned with the research, design, development, construction, testing, science and technology of aircraft and spacecraft. It is divided into two major and overlapping branches: aeronautical engineering and astronautical engineering. Aeronautics deals with aircraft that operate in earth atmosphere, and astronautics deals with spacecraft that operates outside the earth’s atmosphere.

Aeronautical engineering was the original term for the field. As flight technology advanced to include craft operating in outer space, the broader term “aerospace engineering” has largely replaced it in common usage. Aerospace engineering, particularly the astronautics branch, is often referred to colloquially as “rocket science”, such as in popular culture.

An aircraft maintenance engineer (AME) is a licensed person who carries out and certifies aircraft maintenance. This same title is used in a number of different countries, including Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, India, and New Zeeland. A licensed aircraft maintenance engineer (L – AME) is an AME with an inspection authorization.

License categories

Aircraft maintenance licenses include the following categories:

Category A

Category B1 (Aerospace)

Category B2 (Avionics)

Category B3 (Support Staff)

Category C (Base Maintenance)

Categories A and B1 are subdivided into subcategories relative to combinations of aeroplanes, helicopters, turbine and piston engines. These subcategories are:

A1 and B1.1 Aeroplanes Turbine

A2 and B1.2 Aeroplanes Piston

A3 and B1.3 Helicopters Turbine

A4 and B1.4 Helicopters Piston

Category B3 is applicable to piston-engine non-pressurised aeroplanes of 2 000 kg MTOM and below.

Basic knowledge requirements

  • An applicant for an aircraft maintenance license, or the addition of a category or subcategory to such a license, shall demonstrate by examination a level of knowledge in the appropriate subject modules. The examination shall be conducted either by a training organisation appropriately approved by the competent authority.
  • The training courses and examinations shall be passed within 10 years prior to the application for an aircraft maintenance license or the addition of a category or subcategory to such aircraft maintenance license. Should this not be the case, examination credits may however be obtained in accordance with point (c).
  • The applicant may apply to the competent authority for full or partial examination credit to the basic knowledge requirements for:
  • 1. Basic knowledge examinations that do not meet the requirement described in point (b) above; and
  • 2. Any other technical qualification considered by the competent authority to be equivalent to the knowledge standard of Part-66. Credits shall be granted in accordance with regulation.
  • Credits expire 10 years after they were granted to the applicant by the competent authority. The applicant may apply for new credits after expiration.

Basic experience requirements

(a) An applicant for an aircraft maintenance license shall have acquired:

1. for category A, subcategories B1.2 and B1.4 and category B3:

(i) 3 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training; or

 (ii) 2 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or

(iii) 1 year of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a basic training course approved in accordance with regulation;

2. for category B2 and subcategories B1.1 and B1.3:

(i) 5 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training; or

(ii) 3 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker, in a technical trade; or

(iii) 2 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a basic training course approved in accordance with regulation;

3. for category C with respect to large aircraft:

(i) 3 years of experience exercising category B1.1, B1.3 or B2 privileges on large aircraft or as support staff according to regulation; or

(ii) 5 years of experience exercising category B1.2 or B1.4 privileges on large aircraft or as support staff according to regulation;

4. for category C with respect to other than large aircraft: 3 years of experience exercising category B1 or B2 privileges on other than large aircraft or as support staff according to regulation;

5.for category C obtained through the academic route: an applicant holding an academic degree in a technical discipline, from a university or other higher educational institution recognized by the competent authority, 3 years of experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance environment on a representative selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance including 6 months of observation of base maintenance tasks.

(b)An applicant for an extension to an aircraft maintenance license shall have a minimum civil aircraft maintenance experience requirement appropriate to the additional category or subcategory of license applied for.

(c) The experience shall be practical and involve a representative cross section of maintenance tasks on aircraft.

(d)At least 1 year of the required experience shall be recent maintenance experience on aircraft of the category/subcategory for which the initial aircraft maintenance license is sought. For subsequent category/ subcategory additions to an existing aircraft maintenance license, the additional recent maintenance experience required may be less than 1 year, but shall be at least 3 months. The required experience shall be dependent upon the difference between the license category/subcategory held and applied for. Such additional experience shall be typical of the new license category/subcategory sought.

(e)Notwithstanding point (a), aircraft maintenance experience gained outside a civil aircraft maintenance environment shall be accepted when such maintenance is equivalent to that required by this Annex (Part-66) as established by the competent authority. Additional experience of civil aircraft maintenance shall, however, be required to ensure adequate understanding of the civil aircraft maintenance environment.

(f)Experience shall have been acquired within the 10 years preceding the application for an aircraft maintenance license or the addition of a category or subcategory to such a license.

Basic Knowledge Requirements 1. Knowledge levels for Category A, B1, B2, B3 and C Aircraft Maintenance Licence

Basic knowledge for categories A, B1, B2 and B3 are indicated by knowledge levels (1, 2 or 3) against each applicable subject. Category C applicants shall meet either the category B1 or the category B2 basic knowledge levels. The knowledge level indicators are defined on 3 levels as follows:

LEVEL 1: A familiarization with the principal elements of the subject.

Objectives:

(a) The applicant should be familiar with the basic elements of the subject.

(b) The applicant should be able to give a simple description of the whole subject, using common words and examples.

(c) The applicant should be able to use typical terms.

LEVEL 2: A general knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject and an ability to apply that knowledge.

Objectives:

(a) The applicant should be able to understand the theoretical fundamentals of the subject.

(b)The applicant should be able to give a general description of the subject using, as appropriate, typical examples.

(c) The applicant should be able to use mathematical formulae in conjunction with physical laws describing the subject.

(d) The applicant should be able to read and understand sketches, drawings and schematics describing the subject.

(e) The applicant should be able to apply his knowledge in a practical manner using detailed procedures.

LEVEL 3: A detailed knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject and a capacity to combine and apply the separate elements of knowledge in a logical and comprehensive manner.

Objectives:

(a) The applicant should know the theory of the subject and interrelationships with other subjects.

(b) The applicant should be able to give a detailed description of the subject using theoretical fundamentals and specific examples.

(c) The applicant should understand and be able to use mathematical formulae related to the subject.

(d) The applicant should be able to read, understand and prepare sketches, simple drawings and schematics describing the subject.

(e)The applicant should be able to apply his knowledge in a practical manner using manufacturer’s instructions.

(f)The applicant should be able to interpret results from various sources and measurements and apply corrective action where appropriate.